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Library 101  

Last Updated: Aug 22, 2017 URL: http://libguides.eosc.edu/lib101 Print Guide RSS Updates

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Online Catalogs

  • Library Catalog
      Use this catalog to find books in the Eastern Oklahoma State College library.
  • WorldCat
      This is the largest catalog in the world, with holdings from thousands of libraries all over the world. Use to find books that may be accessed through Interlibrary Loan.
 

How Our Books are Arranged

We use the Dewey Decimal System to Arrange our books in the library. The Dewey system arranges every subject under a number system, where each number in a 1,000 number classification scheme corresponds to a specific subject. Here are the ten main classes of the Dewey Decimal System:

000-099 GENERALITIES
100-199 PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY
200-299 RELIGION
300-399 SOCIAL SCIENCES
400-499 LANGUAGE
500-599 NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS
600-699 TECHNOLOGY (Applied Sciences)
700-799 THE ARTS
800-899 LITERATURE
900-999 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY
 

The Dewey Decimal System

The Guide to Dewey Decimal Classification link below will take you to a page that shows how all subjects are covered in the Dewey Classification system,

Guide to Dewey Decimal Classification

 

What's In A Book

Do you know what to use a glossary for? And what the heck is a glossary anyway?

This description of the various parts of a book should help you navigate textbooks and reference sources. Make the books work for you!

 

Table Of Contents

What is it? 
A list of the sections and/or chapters in the book.

Where is it?
At the front of the book.

How is it organized?
Listed in the order in which they appear.

Example of how to use it:
Use the table of contents when you are looking for a broad subject area. For example, you have a general book on criminal justice, and want to find the chapter on community policing.

 

What's In A Book

Do you know what to use a glossary for? And what the heck is a glossary anyway?

This description of the various parts of a book should help you navigate textbooks and reference sources. Make the books work for you!

 

Index

What is it?
A list of subjects, names, events, places, etc. that are discussed in the book.

Where is it?
At the back of the book.

How is it organized?
Words are listed in alphabetical order, and tell you what page numbers you can use to find them.

Example of how to use it:
Use the index when you want to look up a specific subject. For example, you have a book on medical conditions, and you want to find the pages that mention skin cancer.

 

References

What is it?
A reference list, much like the works cited pages you create for your own papers. This tells you where and how the author researched the book.

Where is it?
At the back of the book.

How is it organized?
Usually alphabetically by author.

Example of how to use it:
You are reading a book on global warming, and are looking for additional or background reading.

 

Glossary

What is it?
A listing of terms mentioned in the book with their definitions, like a mini-dictionary.

Where is it?
At the back of the book, or sometimes at the ends of chapters.

How is it organized?
Terms are listed alphabetically and are accompanied by a definition.

Example of how to use it:
When you come across a word in the book you don’t know. For example, you are reading a book of literary criticism want to know what “allegory” means.

 

Notes

What is it?
A collection of notes (usually numbered) that the author refers to throughout the book. These are similar in concept to the in-text citations you create in your papers. (But they are not exactly the same. See examples below for further explanation.)

Where is it?
Throughout the text of the book, you may see numbers after a word, sentence, or paragraph. These numbers refer to the notes. You may find notes in one of the following places:

  • Newer books tend to list all “endnotes” at the back of the book.
  • Older books tend to have “footnotes” at the bottom of individual pages.

How is it organized?

  • Endnotes will be grouped by chapter, and ordered by number, in the order in which they appear in the book.
  • Footnotes are numbered the same way but appear at the bottom (or “foot”) of the page where they are cited.

Example of how to use it:
You are reading a book where the author cites a research study. The number in the paragraph you are reading will help you find the note, which will give you the citation information for the study. It may also give you background or other information about the study.

As another example, you may be reading a novel that was written 100 years ago, and the author mentions events and people that are no longer popular. The editor of the book may add notes to explain these references.

 

Appendix

This is a general term for something added at the end of the book. It could be some of the items described here like suggested readings or notes, or it could just be additional information.

For example a math book may have formula tables, or a book on the civil rights movement in the US may include an appendix listing a timeline of relevant court cases.

Subject Guide

Profile Image
Kim Pendergraft
Contact Info
Assistant Librarian/Archivist
Eastern Oklahoma State College
Bill H. Hill Library
1301 West Main Street
Wilburton, Oklahoma 74578
918.465.1783
918.465.0112 Fax
kdpendergraft@eosc.edu
Send Email

Subject Guide

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Maria Martinez
Contact Info
Director of Library Media Services
Bill H. Hill Library
Eastern Oklahoma State College
1301 W. Main Street
Wilburton, OK 74578
918.465.1711
918.465.0112 Fax
Send Email

Subject Guide

Profile Image
Maria Gabriela Arroyo
Contact Info
Administrative Assistant to the Librarian
Eastern Oklahoma State College
Bill H. Hill Library
1301 W. Main Street
Wilburton, OK 74578
918.465.1781
918.465.0112 Fax
marroyo@eosc.edu
Send Email
 
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